The two plants that produced the peppers in the following photos were grown in-ground and in a double-bucket setup. Seeds for this yellow Scorpion came courtesy fellow grower, @fxbgHOT. Both plants were a bit slow to get going, but each produced a plethora of fruit that I have thoroughly enjoyed fresh and packed up in the freezer for later.

Yellow Scorpion pepper

These particular pods are pretty indicative of the rest of the fruit harvested in terms of appears. All were lobed with smooth, yellow skin. Many produced gnarly stingers like the smaller pepper in the photo above. Inside, the majority of the picked peppers were chock-a-block full of spongey placenta that filled just about every nook and cranny.

Yellow Scorpion pepper

Once cut open, these fruit produce an aroma with a faint floral trait, lemony zest and fruity citrus notes. These things smell like they are going to be quite warm. And, sure enough, they are.

But first, there’s a good bit of floral flavors – though not perfumy – with an earthy, orange peel trait. The flavors linger for good while the heat builds pretty quickly, starting at the tip of the tongue, spreading smoothly across the roof of the mouth and down the throat. Once it takes hold, these Scorpion pods are hot, peaking at an intense sting on the tongue. The plateau doesn’t extend its stay too long and starts to fade slowly, but only after causing a pretty intense drool response.

Yellow Scorpion pepper

I have loved this peppers. They are solid in every regard – flavor, burn and overall appeal for sauces and powders. I don’t have any more fresh for use in tacos, but I have plenty stored up for the cold Winter months to help keep me warm inside and out.