Of the two mystery peppers that were labeled as “Trinidad Scorpions” when I purchased them in early June, this was the plant I was most excited about, especially as the pods continued to grow. The first mystery plant had more than one tell-tale sign that it may have been a Scotch Bonnet variety or in the very least crossed with one. But this plant, though it took on a bit of a habanero appearance, started to look more and more intriguing as the peppers ripened.

Pepper Photo

Just like the first pepper, I had also planned on sampling a few of these pods in order to possibly identify it as I prepared them for drying. I grabbed the biggest baddest one I had and cut into it with a crunch. As you can see below, the wall isn’t overly thick, but it did put up a good fight with the knife. And once I saw that placenta, I knew there was potential for some fire.

Pepper Photo

And then I took a sniff. It has a hint of a floral trait, but smelled mostly of just vegetables, like your standard bell pepper. I took a small slice. It was sweet with that same floral trait, but zero heat. I took a bigger slice — same deal. Thinking this one was a dud, I sampled a second pod. I eventually went through all five peppers that I had picked, taking a nibble from each (placenta and all). Not a single one presented any heat at all. They all had your standard red bell pepper characteristics.

Pepper Photo

Well, needless to say, I’m not drying any of these fruit, nor am I collecting any seeds from it. To say I’m disappointed would be an understatement. I was really looking forward to drying a few scorpion pods. I haven’t given up on the plant yet as there are still several fruit ripening on it, but I don’t have high hopes.